Traveling and Vacationing With Your Dog!

Most dog people would like nothing more than to share the adventures and memories of a road trip and vacation with their dog. The first thing to consider is how fair that would be to your pet. Is your dog an adventurous one that would love to accompany you? Or, would your pet prefer to gracefully bow out and stay closer to home?

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Who’s Going?…Who’s Staying Home?

Let’s face it, some dogs detest or cannot tolerate car rides. Just the sound of the car keys never mind backing out the driveway has their tummies in a knot. This is not the dog you want to force on a road trip. It will become an unforgettable nightmare before you even leave town…and remember you’ll still have that trip home to look forward to.

Instead of stressing both yourself and your dog, find a mutually pleasant alternative schlüsseldienst in der nähe. Maybe you can convince someone in the family or a friend to watch your dog. Or, you may have to consider a dog sitter or boarding facility.

It’s a good idea to introduce your dog to the dog sitter or boarding facility a few weeks before you leave. This gives them a little time to adjust. What surprises many owners is just how well they usually adjust when they feel comfortable with their surroundings.

Now that we have the homebody taken care of, let’s focus on what you need to do, for your “Cruising Canine.”

Before You Head Out

Check to see if there are any breed restrictions! Nothing worse than having to turn around and return home before your vacation even starts, because your dog is not welcomed at that location.

Make sure your puppy or dog is up-to-date on their inoculations for your destination and put a copy of their records in the car immediately!

While you’re at the vet, have your dog chipped. Should they get lost at a rest stop or at your destination, at least you’ll have the piece of mind knowing when they are found, they can be scanned and you will be reunited. This will come in very helpful, should they lose their collar or tags. It’s always a good idea to have a back-up number included.

Make sure their collar fits correctly and has external identification with the dog’s name, your name, home address and phone number as well as a phone number at your destination. A back-up number for back home won’t hurt.

Get your pet familiar with being crated or harnessed before the trip.

Have at least one extra set of car keys made. That way, you won’t have to find a locksmith because your dog is locked in the car.

Pack their suitcase or backpack too! Remember to pack any medications, bowls, spare leashes, spare collar with I.D. tags, favorite toy, blanket, first aid kit, brush, food, treats, towels, a 30 foot training lead and those all important clean-up bags! Don’t forget the camera!

Check into pet-friendly accommodations and make your reservations before you hit the road. Not all hospitality facilities are all that hospitable to pets!

Most “pet friendly” hotels or motels do not allow you to leave your pet unattended in the room. It may be helpful to find a local doggie daycare facility nearby. Most tourist attractions, restaurants, and beaches may have rules about permitting non-service dogs in their site. Having a back-up plan is a good way to allow you to enjoy your day trip and not worry about your pet.

Something you may not want to think about, but should is what would you do if your pet does get lost? Naturally you’d contact the local newspaper and animal control shelter. Still, you may not have the luxury of waiting around until your dog is found. It’s not a bad idea to have LOST poster prepared. Keep it simple, am updated, clear picture of your dog and your phone number. Hopefully, you’ll never need it, but like the inoculations records, you have it ready should you need it.

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